Resources: Journals, Organizations & Texts

JOURNALS

ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies

http://acme-journal.org/index.php/acme

Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography

http://antipodefoundation.org/about-the-journal-and-foundation/a-radical-journal-of-geography/

Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress

http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/anthropology+%26+archaeology/journal/11759

Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites

http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/cma

Critical Historical Studies

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/chs.html

Critical Sociology

http://crs.sagepub.com/

Heritage & Society

http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/hso

International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies

http://www.isrn.qut.edu.au/publications/internationaljournal/

International Journal of Cultural Property

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JCP

International Journal of Heritage Studies

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjhs20/current

International Journal of Intangible Heritage

http://www.ijih.org/mainMgr.ijih?cmd=mainPageView

Journal of Community Archaeology & Heritage

http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/cah

Journal of Contemporary Archaeology

http://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/JCA

Journal of Heritage Tourism

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjht20/current

MUSEUM International

http://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=2356&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

Public Archaeology

http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/pua

UnderCurrents: Journal of Critical Environmental Studies

http://currents.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/currents

The George Wright Forum

http://georgewright.org/forumcurrent

 

ORGANIZATIONS

Association of Critical Heritage Studies (ACHS)

http://www.criticalheritagestudies.org/

Association of Critical Heritage Studies Canada (ACHS-CA)

https://achsca.wordpress.com/

Association of Critical Heritage Studies United States (ACHS-USA)

http://achsus.umbc.edu/

Association of Critical Sociology

http://criticalsociology.org/

Conserving the Human Environment

http://heritagestudies.org/

Critical Genocide Studies Project

http://www.ncas.rutgers.edu/center-study-genocide-conflict-resolution-and-human-rights/critical-genocide-studies-project

George Wright Society

http://georgewright.org/

Institute for Critical Heritage and Tourism

icht.ca

International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM)

http://www.iccrom.org/

International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS)

http://www.icomos.org/en/

International Critical Geography Group (ICCG)

http://internationalcriticalgeography.org/

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

http://www.iucn.org/

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

http://en.unesco.org/themes/protecting-our-heritage-and-fostering-creativity

World Archaeological Congress (WAC)

http://www.worldarchaeologicalcongress.org/

 

TEXTS

Below are recent books listed under the categories INTRODUCTORY TEXTS and CASE STUDIES & THEORY.

Additional readings, including more foundational texts, can be found in the ICHT bibliography Key Readings in Critical History, Heritage, and Tourism Studies, available online here: https://www.academia.edu/18355626/Key_Readings_in_Critical_History_Heritage_and_Tourism_Studies

For those studying heritage tourism on Canada’s West Coast (i.e., British Columbia), a comprehensive annotated bibliography is available here: http://www.sfu.ca/grow/images/PDF/PDFsHeritageTourismBiblioAnnotated2008.pdf

 

INTRODUCTORY TEXTS

What Objects Mean: An Introduction to Material Culture, 2nd Ed.

Arthur Asa Berger, Left Coast Press, 2014

Arthur Asa Berger, author of an array of texts in communication, popular culture, and social theory, is back with the second edition of his popular, user-friendly guide for students who want to understand the social meanings of objects. In this broadly interdisciplinary text, Berger takes the reader through half a dozen theoretical models that are commonly used to analyze objects. He then describes and analyzes eleven objects, many of them new to this edition—including smartphones, Facebook, hair dye, and the American flag—showing how they demonstrate concepts like globalization, identity, and nationalism. The book includes a series of exercises that allow students to analyse objects in their own environment. Brief and inexpensive, this introductory guide will be used in courses ranging from anthropology to art history, pop culture to psychology.

Understanding Heritage in Practice

Susie West (ed.), Manchester University Press, 2010

Written by an interdisciplinary team of scholars, this authoritative text explores how heritage is delivered and consumed in a global world, and the ever-increasing ways in which heritage is actively valued. New international case studies see heritage as social action, as performance, and as a vehicle for innovations in tourism, challenging the notion that only official heritage practices can successfully select and interpret our links with the past. Aimed primarily at students in heritage studies and professionals in heritage industries, this book is one of three in the Understanding Global Heritage series.

Understanding the Politics of Heritage

Rodney Harrison (ed.), Manchester University Press, 2009

Written by an interdisciplinary team of scholars, this authoritative text presents an engaging narrative of the way politics features in heritage conservation and management. New international case studies illustrate how notions of identity, social class and nationhood may be woven into the provision of official heritage, and how heritage may be seen to be less about upholding truth or authenticity and more about delivering political objectives. Aimed primarily at students in heritage studies and professionals in heritage industries, this book is one of three in the Understanding Global Heritage series.

Heritage and Globalisation

Sophia Labadi and Colin Long (ed.), Routledge, 2010

This volume analyzes the politics, policy and practice of cultural heritage at the global level, identifying the major directions in which international heritage practice is moving, and exploring the key issues likely to shape the cultural heritage field well into the twenty-first century. It examines the tensions between the universal claims of much heritage practice, particularly that associated with the World Heritage system, and national and local perspectives. It explores the international legal framework developed since World War Two to protect heritage, particularly at times of war, and from theft, showing how contemporary global problems of conflict and illicit trade continue to challenge the international legal system. Heritage and Globalisation critiques the incorporation of heritage in the world economy through the policies of international development organisations and the global tourism trade. It also approaches heritage from seldom-considered perspectives, as a form of aid, as a development paradigm, and as a form of sustainable practice. The book identifies some of the most pressing issues likely to face the heritage industry at a global level in coming decades, including the threat posed by climate change and the need for poverty reduction. Providing a historically and theoretically rigorous approach to heritage as a form of and manifestation of globalisation, the volume’s emphasis is on contemporary issues and new fields for heritage practice.

Heritage Tourism

Hyung Yu Park, Routledge, 2013

Heritage tourism has become an increasingly significant component of the global tourism industry, particularly in countries striving to diversify away from sea, sand and sun. This growth has had profound influences on the presentation and representation of both tangible and intangible heritage within tourism context. The concept of heritage continues to evolve with its fast-changing political, economic and socio-cultural surroundings. Therefore it is essential that heritage tourism engages with the new form of globalised communities and societies, which have become more assimilated to each other but yet strive to sustain their own distinctive locality. This book aims to offer a thorough critical examination and systematic evaluation of the unique dynamics of heritage and tourism development from both social sciences and management perspectives. It incorporates both global and local perspectives in theorising and managing heritage tourism. While focusing on reviewing and analysing key academic concepts and debates including authenticity, commodification, globalisation and heritage interpretation, this book also discusses and evaluates topical issues such as sustainable development, marketing strategies and digital technologies including social media. It theoretically locates heritage discourses in the analysis of heritage tourism development and management drawing on various perspectives, from tourism, heritage studies, sociology, anthropology, politics and geography to management and marketing studies. Including case studies of topical concerns, controversies and challenges it will encourage readers to develop a new and insightful understanding of the dialectical relationship between heritage and tourism development. This book is essential reading for students studying tourism, heritage studies, cultural studies as well as related disciplines.

Heritage and Tourism: Place, Encounter, Engagement

Russell Staiff, Robyn Bushell and Steve Watson (eds), Routledge, 2013

The complex relationship between heritage places and people, in the broadest sense, can be considered dialogic, a communicative act that has implications for both sides of the ‘conversation’. This is the starting point for Heritage and Tourism. However, the ‘dialogue’ between visitors and heritage sites is complex. ‘Visitors’ have, for many decades, become synonymous with ‘tourists’ and the tourism industry and so the dialogic relationship between heritage place and tourists has produced a powerful critique of this often contested relationship. Further, at the heart of the dialogic relationship between heritage places and people is the individual experience of heritage where generalities give way to particularities of geography, place and culture, where anxieties about the past and the future mark heritage places as sites of contestation, sites of silences, sites rendered political and ideological, sites powerfully intertwined with representation, sites of the imaginary and the imagined. Under the aegis of the term ‘dialogues’ the heritage/tourism interaction is reconsidered in ways that encourage reflection about the various communicative acts between heritage places and their visitors and the ways these are currently theorized, so as to either step beyond – where possible – the ontological distinctions between heritage places and tourists or to re-imagine the dialogue or both. Heritage and Tourism is thus an important contribution to understanding the complex relationship between heritage and tourism.

Culture on Tour: Ethnographies of Travel

Edward M. Bruner, The University of Chicago Press, 2004

Recruited to be a lecturer on a group tour of Indonesia, Edward M. Bruner decided to make the tourists aware of tourism itself. He photographed tourists photographing Indonesians, asking the group how they felt having their pictures taken without their permission. After a dance performance, Bruner explained to the group that the exhibition was not traditional, but instead had been set up specifically for tourists. His efforts to induce reflexivity led to conflict with the tour company, which wanted the displays to be viewed as replicas of culture and to remain unexamined. Although Bruner was eventually fired, the experience became part of a sustained exploration of tourist performances, narratives, and practices. Synthesizing more than twenty years of research in cultural tourism, Culture on Tour analyzes a remarkable variety of tourist productions, ranging from safari excursions in Kenya and dance dramas in Bali to an Abraham Lincoln heritage site in Illinois. Bruner examines each site in all its particularity, taking account of global and local factors, as well as the multiple perspectives of the various actors—the tourists, the producers, the locals, and even the anthropologist himself. The collection will be essential to those in the field as well as to readers interested in globalization and travel.
CASE STUDIES & THEORY

Mundane Objects: Materiality and Non-verbal Communication

Pierre Lemonnier, Left Coast Press, 2012

This concise book shows the importance of objects that are considered ordinary by cultural outsiders and scholars, yet lie at the heart of the systems of thought and practices of their makers and users. This volume demonstrates the role of these objects in non-verbal communication, both in non-ritual and in ritual situations. Lemonnier shows that some objects, their physical properties and their material implementation, are wordless expressions of fundamental aspects of a way of living and thinking, as well as sometimes the only means of expressing the inexpressible. Through the study of the most mundane technical activities such as fence building, creating models cars, or trapping fish, we often gain a better understanding of what these objects mean and how they work within their cultures of origin. In addition to anthropologists and archaeologists, this book will also be of interest to sociologists, historians, philosophers, cognitive anthropologists and primatologists, for whom the intertwining of “function” and “style” is the very mark of all cultural behavior.

The Semiotics of Heritage Tourism

Emma Waterton and Steve Watson, Channel View Publications, 2014

This book is a fast-paced and thorough re-evaluation of what heritage tourism means to the people who experience it. It draws on contemporary thinking in human geography and heritage studies, and applies it to a sector of tourism that is both pervasive yet poorly researched in terms of the perspective of tourists themselves. In a series of lucid and tightly argued chapters, it traces the use of semiotics as an analytical tool from its theoretical origins in text, through the all-important dynamics of visuality into an expanded realm of feeling and sensuality. Challenging assumptions about the way that heritage is experienced, this book uses examples from around the world to explore the semiotic landscape that surrounds heritage sites, linking what is represented about the past and how it feels to be there.

Dissonant Heritage: The Management of the Past as a Resource in Conflict

G. J. Tunbridge and J. E. Ashworth, Elsevier, 2000

There is a growing interest in the study of heritage. This reflects a realization of the importance of heritage as a major industry, particularly in tourism, as well as the essential support it gives to cultural and social identities. This study attempts to identify and examine the heritage industry, offering a better understanding of the nature of heritage, its various uses and important economic, social, cultural and political impacts. An extensive theoretical discussion highlights “dissonant” heritage – the conflicts and disharmonies that inevitably occur as a result of the relationship between the past and its contemporary users; the growth of dissonant heritage with the general heritage phenomenon; its roots in the fundamental process of recognizing, marketing and using heritage; its powerful association with the cultural, social and political aspects of human diversity which prompt the question “whose heritage?”; and its climax in the contention over the heritage of atrocity. The distinctive manifestation of dissonant heritage in “old world” and post-colonial environments is also illustrated by considering issues taken from Central Europe, Canada and South Africa.

The Tourist-Historic City: Retrospect and Prospect of Managing the Heritage City

J. E. Ashworth and G. J. Tunbridge, Routledge, 2000

Develops the concept of the tourist-historic city as a practical means of managing urban places of historical value. Introduces the role of cities in tourism and vice-versa. Presents a framework for analyzing the historic city, the tourist city and the tourist-historic city. Compares current management and planning in tourist-historic cities, with examples drawn from both Europe and America. Assesses the future implications of the tourist-historic city in western urban society.

Tourism Geography: Critical Understandings of Place, Space and Experience, 3rd Ed.

Stephen Williams and Alan A. Lew, Routledge, 2014

Tourism Geography develops a critical understanding of how different geographies of tourism are created and maintained. Drawing on both historical and contemporary perspectives, the discussion connects tourism to key geographical concepts relating to globalization, mobility, new geographies of production and consumption, and post-industrial change. The new edition has been fully updated to have an international focus, with global case studies and broader based content. This book is the only up to date and comprehensive review of geographies of tourism and the ways in which geographers can interpret contemporary tourism processes. It provides an accessible yet thorough explanation of concepts and models which promotes an understanding of their applications and limitations.

Contemporary Issues in Cultural Heritage Tourism

Jamie Kaminski, Angela M. Benson and David Arnold (eds.), Routledge, 2013

The perceived quality of a destination’s cultural offering has long been a significant factor in determining tourist choices of destination. More recently, the need to present touristic offerings that include cultural experiences and heritage has become widely recognised, that this aspect of the tourism experience is an important differentiator of destinations, as well as being amongst the most manageable. This has also led to an increase in the management of such experiences through special exhibitions, events and festivals, as well as through ensuring more routine and controlled access to heritage sites. Reflecting the increasing application of cultural heritage as a driver for tourism and development, this book provides for the first time a cohesive volume on the subject that is theoretically rich, practically applied and empirically grounded. Written by expert scholars and practitioners in the field, the book covers a broad range of theoretical perspectives of cultural heritage tourism; regeneration, policy, stakeholders, marketing, socio-economic development, impacts, sustainability, volunteering and ICT. It takes a broad view, integrating international examples of sites, monuments as well as intangible cultural heritage, motor vehicle heritage events and modern art museums. This significant book furthers knowledge of the theory and application of tourism within the context of cultural heritage and will be of interest to students, researchers and practitioners in a range of disciplines.

Marketing Heritage: Archaeology and the Consumption of the Past

Yorke Rowan and Uzi Baram (eds.), AltaMira Press, 2004

What are the implications of mass tourism and globalization for the field of archaeology? How does this change popular understandings of the past? Increasingly archaeological sites worldwide are being commodified for a growing tourist trade. At best, expansion of programs can aid in the protection and historic preservation of sites and strenghten community identities. However, unchecked commercial development may undermine the integrity of these same sites, replacing local interests with corporate ones, economically and culturally. Within this volume, original case studies from well-known sites in Cambodia, Israel, England, Mexico, and North America are presented to address the complex interaction between archaeology and nationalist, political, and commercial policies. This book should appeal to archaeologists, applied anthropologists, tourism and economic development specialists, and historic preservationists alike, as well others with an interest in the preservation of archaeological sites as historic locales.

From Stonehenge to Las Vegas: Archaeology as Popular Culture

Cornelius Holtorf, AltaMira Press, 2005

Indiana Jones. Lara Croft. Archaeologist as folk hero, detective, treasure hunter. The meaning of things below the surface. The life history of Stonehenge. Las Vegas’ Luxor Hotel. Copies of artifacts as contemporary kitch. The connections between archaeology and contemporary culture are endless. Cornelius Holtorf merges archaeological and cultural theory to take readers on an erudite tour of these intersections, using wide-ranging examples and compelling images to support his often controversial theses. Deliberately blurring the borders between past people and present meanings, this ambitious project seeks no less than the redefinition of the term ‘archaeology.’ Equal parts amusing, infuriating, and provocative, this work will interest students and teachers in archaeology, anthropology, cultural studies and human geography, as well as professionals in heritage management and museums.

Enchanting a Disenchanted World: Continuity and Change in the Cathedrals of Consumption, 3rd Ed.

George Ritzer, SAGE, 2010

Enchanting a Disenchanted World is about Disney, about malls, about Cruise Lines, Las Vegas, the World Wide Web, Planet Hollywood, Credit Cards, and all other ways we now consume. Its thesis is that our society has undergone fundamental change because of the way and the level at which we consume. In the process of taking capitalism to a new level, we have created new “cathedrals” of consumption (places which enchant us in order to stay longer and consume more), but these “places” of consumption (whether in our home or at the mall or in cyberspace) are in a constant state of “enchanting the disenchanted” because their rational qualities are both necessary and deadening at the same time, in a constant state of “luring” us through new “spectacle.” In the process of understanding this paradox of (post) modern life, readers understand how the classic social theorists from the past (Marx and Weber) are still very relevant to understanding this social development, as are the post-modern theorist (Beaudrillard and Focault) as well. The recent economic recession will be discussed throughout the book. There are no other “trade-like” books appealing to undergraduates, which combine this ability to connect the “everyday world” of the “20-something consumer” with sociological analysis.

Cultural Tourism: The Partnership between Tourism and Cultural Heritage Management

Bob McKercher, Routledge, 2002

Unique in concept and content, Cultural Tourism: The Partnership Between Tourism and Cultural Heritage Management examines the relationship between the sectors that represent opposite sides of the cultural tourism coin. While tourism professionals assess cultural assets for their profit potential, cultural heritage professionals judge the same assets for their intrinsic value. Sustainable cultural tourism can only occur when the two sides form a true partnership based on understanding and appreciation of each other’s merits. The authors–one, a tourism specialist, the other, a cultural heritage management expert–present a model for a working partnership with mutual benefits, integrating management theory and practice from both disciplines. Cultural Tourism is the first book to combine the different perspectives of tourism management and cultural heritage management. It examines the role of tangible (physical evidence of culture) and intangible (continuing cultural practices, knowledge, and living experiences) heritage, describes the differences between cultural tourism products and cultural heritage assets, and develops a number of conceptual models, including a classification system for cultural tourists, indicators of tourism potential at cultural and heritage assets, and assessment criteria for cultural and heritage assets with tourism potential. Cultural Tourism examines the five main constituent elements involved in cultural tourism: (1) cultural and heritage assets in tourism sites such as the Royal Palace in Bangkok, the Cook Islands, and Alcatraz Prison in San Francisco; (2) tourism–what it is, how it works, and what makes it a success; (3) five different types of cultural tourists; (4) consumption of products, value adding, and commodification; and (5) integrating the first four elements to satisfy the tourist, meet the needs of the tourism industry, and conserve the intrinsic value of the asset. Though tourism and cultural heritage management professionals have mutual interests in the management, conservation, and presentation of cultural and heritage assets, the two sectors operate on parallel planes, maintaining an uneasy partnership with surprisingly little dialogue. Cultural Tourism provides professionals and students in each field with a better understanding of their own roles in the partnership, bridging the gap via sound planning, management, and marketing to produce top-quality, long-lasting cultural tourism products.

Heritage Marketing

Shashi Misiura, Elsevier, 2005

Heritage Marketing is a new and clearly written textbook that systematically addresses the principles of marketing as applied to the heritage sector. The ‘heritage industry’ and its growing importance internationally is defined, as is how it links with the study of modern tourism.

Sustainable Marketing of Cultural and Heritage Tourism

Deepak Chhabra, Routledge, 2010

Cultural attractions play an important role in tourism at all levels, and attract huge numbers of tourists interested in heritage and the arts. Cultural Heritage Tourism has positive economic and social impacts but can also have negative impacts on communities and regions. This book draws together and links ideas of tourism from sustainable marketing perspectives and embeds it within a heritage management setting. Through a discussion and analysis of existing literature and practices this book aims to propose a marketing strategy framework grounded in sustainable principles that can be used to sustain and preserve the authenticity of cultural heritage for future generations, whilst appealing to the suppliers, the regulators, and the consumers. The book first explains the dynamics of cultural heritage with its authenticity underpinnings, marketing, and tourism, and proposes a strategic praxis drawn from core sustainable principles. This is followed by a pragmatic examination of the proposed framework from the shaper’s (provider’s) perspective. The material presented in this book is not merely an agglomeration of documented secondary research, but the theoretical concepts are grounded in empirical research and interactive discussions with students and the travel and tourism industry. A variety of heritage institutions across the globe are used as starting points to test the applicability of the proposed paradigm: these include museums, historic house museums, heritage hotels/resorts, festivals, and heritage merchandize.

Marketing Cultural and Heritage Tourism: A World of Opportunity

Rosemary Rice McCormick, Left Coast Press, 2014

Innovative tourism industry leader Rosemary Rice McCormick guides the reader through the basics of marketing and tourism know-how for museum store managers and other museum and heritage marketing professionals. Packed with valuable ideas and case studies, you will learn how to build your business in the fast-growing, global tourism market, increase museum visitation and museum store sales, leverage business partnerships and tap into that “drive market” that comprises 85% of US travelers. This valuable resource is a must for all those in the business of connecting people with the cultural wealth of our museums and parks. The book received a 2011 SASI-ONE Gold Award from the Shop America Alliance.

Encounters with Popular Pasts: Cultural Heritage and Popular Culture

Mike Robinson and Helaine Silverman (eds.), Springer, 2015

This volume is based on the recognition that heritage is popular and popular culture is now readily transformed into heritage whose meanings and myths reshape social life and political and economic realities as well as re-make “tradition.” The papers in this volume consider: What does popular heritage look like? To whom does it speak? Is it active in dissolving class and cultural boundaries or just in reproducing new ones? How do societies manage a heritage that is fluid, immediate and that straddles extremes of serious conflict and hedonistic frivolity? When/under what circumstances is the creation and expression of new cultural forms – popular culture – capable of being transformed into heritage?

Stones Standing: Archaeology, Colonialism, and Ecotourism in Northern Laos

Anna Källén, Left Coast Press, 2015

This book is an inquiry into the relationships between archaeology, colonialism and ecotourism at the famous standing stones of Hintang, Laos. It investigates the conditions under which archaeological knowledge has been produced, appropriated, contested, commodified, and consumed by colonialism from the 1930s until today and what it shows about the power dynamics of heritage and ecotourism. The volume: explores how the discourses of colonialism and ecotourism affect tourists, archaeologists, heritage managers, and the local community; is written as a set of overlapping creative essays, each giving an overlapping perspective on Hintang; and is a multidisciplinary research project based on ethnographic fieldwork, archival research, interviews with community members, biography, material culture studies, and text analysis.

Ethnicity, Inc.

John L. Comaroff and Jean Comaroff, The University of Chicago Press, 2009

In Ethnicity, Inc. anthropologists John L. and Jean Comaroff analyze a new moment in the history of human identity: its rampant commodification. Through a wide-ranging exploration of the changing relationship between culture and the market, they address a pressing question: Wherein lies the future of ethnicity? Their account begins in South Africa, with the incorporation of an ethno-business in venture capital by a group of traditional African chiefs. But their horizons are global: Native American casinos; Scotland’s efforts to brand itself; a Zulu ethno-theme park named Shakaland; a world religion declared to be intellectual property; a chiefdom made into a global business by means of its platinum holdings; San “Bushmen” with patent rights potentially worth millions of dollars; nations acting as commercial enterprises; and the rapid growth of marketing firms that target specific ethnic populations are just some of the diverse examples that fall under the Comaroffs’ incisive scrutiny. These phenomena range from the disturbing through the intriguing to the absurd. Through them, the Comaroffs trace the contradictory effects of neoliberalism as it transforms identities and social being across the globe. Ethnicity, Inc. is a penetrating account of the ways in which ethnic populations are remaking themselves in the image of the corporation—while corporations coopt ethnic practices to open up new markets and regimes of consumption. Intellectually rigorous but leavened with wit, this is a powerful, highly original portrayal of a new world being born in a tectonic collision of culture, capitalism, and identity.